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Fruit Flies in the Drain? Here’s the Answer | Mr. Rooter Southern OR

Along with the warm weather and abundance of delicious fresh fruits and veggies, summer often also brings fruit fly infestations into our homes. These tiny pests easily multiply quickly, spreading germs and decay to other fruits in the kitchen, as well as contaminating other surfaces in the home.

Fruit flies usually enter the home on fresh produce, and seemingly appear out of nowhere. It’s important to act quickly to prevent these little insects from becoming a bigger infestation. They thrive on decaying fruit and vegetable matter, and the kitchen drain is a prime location for them to set up shop. With its constantly moist environment, and bits of food, the kitchen drain is highly attractive to fruit flies. Sometimes, you can even find them hanging out in a bathroom drain too.

If you have fruit flies in your sink drains, here’s what you should do:

  • Keep all surfaces clean. To get rid of fruit flies in the drain, you also need to focus on any other sources of food in the area. Keep all fruits and veggies in the fridge or in sealed containers. Wipe up any spills immediately and don’t leave dirty dishes out. Wipe countertops and sinks often.
  • Make a homemade trap. After you’ve cleaned up any possible sources of food for the pests, you can try to trap any remaining bugs, and there are a few different ways to do this. In a small container, place a piece of overripe fruit to attract the flies. Alternatively, you can also pour a small amount of beer or wine in the container. Cover with plastic wrap, use a rubber band to secure and poke tiny holes in the plastic wrap. The bugs will find their way inside but won’t be able to get back out.
  • Keep sink drains clean. Sink drains are often overlooked when trying to get rid of fruit flies, but it’s important to keep this area clean to keep the pests at bay. Run your garbage disposal often, if you have one. Then, sanitize the drains using boiling water, bleach, or a combination of baking soda and vinegar. Repeat this process as often as you use the sink to ensure there’s no food left behind for flies.

If you’ve tried all of these methods, and still have issues with fruit flies around your drain, it could be a problem with the p-trap or drain line. In this case, it’s best to call in the professionals. Contact the pros at Mr. Rooter in Southern Oregon for help with all your drain issues.

Sources:

https://www.rotorooter.com/frequently-asked-questions/drains/how-to-get-rid-of-drain-flies/

https://www.countryliving.com/home-maintenance/cleaning/a27284947/how-to-get-rid-of-fruit-flies/

https://www.foodqualityandsafety.com/article/study-fruit-flies-can-spread-foodborne-pathogens/